Slandering God

Why do the powers that be in Hollywood think it is acceptable to use God’s name as a curse in so many films? “GD” this and “JC” that. Sadly, I believe the fault lies with consumers. We may be disgusted with onscreen sex and violence and offended by the language, but we still look the other way flock to theaters. The Trivia Question of the Day I posted on my […]

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Stars and Stripes Forever

What do “Stars and Stripes Forever,” Mr. Peabody, and ghosts have in common? Clifton Webb, of course!  You’ll be glad to know I have found some very fun minutiae regarding yesterday’s Trivia Question of the Day: QUESTION: (TV & Film): Who did actor Clifton Webb portray in the film “Stars and Stripes Forever?” ANSWER: John Philip Sousa What would a Fourth of July parade be without a rousing rendition of […]

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God Bless Us Every One

Here’s today’s Trivia Question of the Day: QUESTION: Literature: What is the name of the sickly character in Charles Dickens’ book, “A Christmas Carol?” ANSWER: Tiny Tim Evidently, this question was far too easy for my social media followers. I expect, however, that you will find some of the details I uncovered while researching this blog to be fascinating. First a little background. A Christmas Carol is a novella by prolific […]

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What Caused the Bubonic Plague?

Today I started a new feature on my Facebook Author Page  www.facebook.com/pages/Amy-Hammond-Hagberg/107548285944928 called “Trivia Question of the Day.” There will be five categories: Nature, TV and Film, Literature, Food and Drink, and Bible. Here’s the first question: QUESTION: Nature: Which two creatures are responsible for spreading the Bubonic Plague? ANSWER: Sorry, this was a trick question. Technically speaking, there were actually three creatures responsible for the spread of bubonic plague: rats, […]

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When I Need You

As I sit here watching my baby ducks play in their wading pool, something very important has dawned on me. It seems to me there are two kinds of people, those who are needy and those who need to be needed. I am the latter. I thrive on being needed. I’ve spent most of my adult life taking care of something or someone. First I took care of my clients. […]

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GRAMMAR GEM OF THE DAY: “Whom” Do You Love

Who vs. whom is the subject of the day. There are several easy tricks to help you choose the best option: Who DOES something (it’s a subject like she or he) and whom has something done TO it (it’s an object like her or him). Try substituting another pronoun such as she/her or he/him A preposition (such as “by,” “for,” or “to” often comes just before whom. For example, “For […]

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GRAMMAR GEM: Putting the Brakes on Broke

The verb “break” is a tough one for some people. Of course, there is the obvious confusion between “brake,” meaning to stop or slow something (as with a car), and “break,” which means to split into pieces or smash. Just to confuse you a little more, there is also the noun version of “break,” which is a bodiless carriage frame used for breaking in horses. But I digress. The biggest […]

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How NFL Kicker Jason Hanson Knows God is Real

Back in 2005 I had an opportunity to interview Jason Hanson of the Detroit Lions. He shared his testimony for my first book and later on my podcast.  Last Saturday night I was in the audience for the KLOVE Fan Awards at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, TN. I was thrilled when Jason’s name was called as a nominee for the Sports Impact award. After the ceremony it was wonderful […]

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GRAMMAR GEM: Preposition Placement

Most of us were told in school never to end a sentence in a preposition. If that’s true, why do so many people do it? When I hear somebody end a sentence with “at” it is like I’ve just heard fingernails screech down a chalkboard. “Where are we having dinner at?” ACK! In this case, “at” is a completely wasted word; it would be much more correct to say, “Where […]

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GRAMMAR GEM OF THE DAY – Capitalizing Titles

I know being the head of a country is a big deal, but that doesn’t mean a president always deserves a capital letter. This grammatical rule trips up many of us. A formal title is only capitalized if it is used in direct connection to that person’s name. “The president of our country is Barack Obama.” “The head of our country is President Barack Obama.” Do you see the difference? […]

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